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  • Snap beats revenue estimates as it adds more users
    on 22/10/2019 at 8:10 pm

    Snap Inc beat analysts' quarterly estimates for revenue on Tuesday as it added more users to its photo messaging app Snapchat, helped by new features such as games within the app. Soon after it was launched in 2011, Snap became an instant hit with younger users because of its quirky visual effects that allows them to change their gender in photos or add a dog filter on their face. Spiegel said now that the new Android app has been rolled out, the company is working to create a better user experience in its international markets, helping to contribute to the growth in daily active users.

  • Is Ares Capital Corporation (ARCC) A Good Stock To Buy?
    on 22/10/2019 at 8:01 pm

    Many investors, including Paul Tudor Jones or Stan Druckenmiller, have been saying before the Q4 market crash that the stock market is overvalued due to a low interest rate environment that leads to companies swapping their equity for debt and focusing mostly on short-term performance such as beating the quarterly earnings estimates. In the first

  • Johnson & Johnson CEO testified Baby Powder was safe 13 days before FDA bombshell
    on 22/10/2019 at 8:01 pm

    LOS ANGELES/NEW YORK (Reuters) - Facing off against a plaintiff’s lawyer for the first time about Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder, the company’s Chief Executive Alex Gorsky earlier this month insisted that the company’s iconic brand was safe. “We unequivocally believe that our talc and our baby powder does not contain asbestos,” Gorsky testified in an Oct. 3 deposition in a case involving a retired Indiana college professor who alleges his cancer was caused by the Baby Powder he used for decades. The deposition has not been previously reported.

  • Here is What Hedge Funds Think About Store Capital Corporation (STOR)
    on 22/10/2019 at 7:58 pm

    Our extensive research has shown that imitating the smart money can generate significant returns for retail investors, which is why we track nearly 750 active prominent money managers and analyze their quarterly 13F filings. The stocks that are heavily bought by hedge funds historically outperformed the market, though there is no shortage of high profile

  • An Intrinsic Calculation For TransAlta Renewables Inc. (TSE:RNW) Suggests It's 41% Undervalued
    on 22/10/2019 at 7:39 pm

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of TransAlta Renewables Inc. (TSE:RNW) by taking...

  • Boeing names Stan Deal CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes
    on 22/10/2019 at 7:34 pm

    Boeing’s Executive in Charge of Commercial Airplanes, Kevin McAllister, is leaving the company. He is the most senior official to depart as the airline maker struggles to contain the fallout from the crashes of two 737 Max. Yahoo Finance's Myles Udland breaks it down on The Final Round.

  • These 4 Measures Indicate That SS&C Technologies Holdings (NASDAQ:SSNC) Is Using Debt Reasonably Well
    on 22/10/2019 at 7:19 pm

    Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously...

  • Is Twitter (NYSE:TWTR) A Risky Investment?
    on 22/10/2019 at 7:16 pm

    Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility...

  • Why Dividend Hunters Love Preferred Bank (NASDAQ:PFBC)
    on 22/10/2019 at 6:52 pm

    Is Preferred Bank (NASDAQ:PFBC) a good dividend stock? How can we tell? Dividend paying companies with growing...

  • Chevron Sees ‘Boom Boom Boom’ Permian Despite Signs of Slowdown
    on 22/10/2019 at 6:23 pm

    (Bloomberg) -- Chevron Corp. sees a “boom boom boom kind of economy” in West Texas, shrugging off signs of a Permian Basin slowdown showing up in everything from jobs to hotel rooms.Steve Green, president of Chevron’s North American business, was insistent that the world’s biggest shale patch won’t be susceptible to historic boom-and-bust cycles that have dominated the Texas oil economy for decades. His booming nod to continuing good times came Tuesday during a panel discussion at the Lone Star Energy Forum in Austin.“We see a long, healthy pace of activity in the Permian and Texas for decades to come,” Green said at the forum, sponsored by the Texas Oil & Gas Association.The comments come within days of earnings releases by Schlumberger Ltd. and Halliburton Co., two of the world’s biggest providers of oilfield equipment and services, which detailed an annual drop in North American sales. The companies warned investors that the slowdown could be sharper than an end-of-year slump seen in 2018.Don Templin, chief financial officer at Marathon Petroleum Corp., who was also on the panel, chimed in on the Texas love fest. But he also added an ominous warning.The Findlay, Ohio-based refiner has access to global markets and a “good portion” of the 400,000 barrels a day of refined product that it exports is from the gulf coast. But he said investments in export infrastructure will be important in keeping the shale boom moving forward over the next five years.“Texas plays a really important role,” he said. “But if you don’t have export capabilities, all the product produced in the Permian gets bottlenecked somewhere, and at some point in time, that will dampen the production.”To contact the reporter on this story: David Wethe in Houston at [email protected] contact the editors responsible for this story: Simon Casey at [email protected], Reg Gale, Joe CarrollFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Boeing texts reveal flawed simulator, not smoking gun: ex-colleagues
    on 22/10/2019 at 6:17 pm

    Four days after leaked internal pilot messages set off a media firestorm for Boeing Co , former colleagues have defended a former pilot who voiced concerns about unreported 737 MAX software problems two years before fatal crashes. Chief Technical Pilot Mark Forkner described in the leaked messages how MCAS cockpit software, which has since been linked to crashes in Indonesia in 2018 and in Ethiopia in March this year, was "running rampant" during a flight simulator session. The messages fueled speculation that either Boeing or Forkner or both knew about problems with the plane's flight control software well before the two crashes which killed a total of 346 people, sending its shares sharply lower.

  • UPDATE 1-Canada's Husky lays off workers as energy sector struggles
    on 22/10/2019 at 6:09 pm

    Canadian oil and gas producer Husky Energy Inc laid off a number of employees on Tuesday, a company spokeswoman said, the latest sign of how Canada's energy sector is struggling with declining capital investment and sluggish growth. Calgary, Alberta-based Husky declined to say how many jobs were affected by the cuts. "Husky has been taking steps to better align the organization and workforce with our capital plan and strategy," spokeswoman Kim Guttormson said in a statement.

  • UPDATE 1-Boeing texts reveal flawed simulator, not smoking gun - ex-colleagues
    on 22/10/2019 at 6:06 pm

    Four days after leaked internal pilot messages set off a media firestorm for Boeing Co, former colleagues have defended a former pilot who voiced concerns about unreported 737 MAX software problems two years before fatal crashes. Chief Technical Pilot Mark Forkner described in the leaked messages how MCAS cockpit software, which has since been linked to crashes in Indonesia in 2018 and in Ethiopia in March this year, was "running rampant" during a flight simulator session. The messages fuelled speculation that either Boeing or Forkner or both knew about problems with the plane's flight control software well before the two crashes which killed a total of 346 people, sending its shares sharply lower.

  • Boeing texts reveal flawed simulator, not smoking gun - ex-colleagues
    on 22/10/2019 at 5:24 pm

    Four days after leaked internal pilot messages set off a media firestorm for Boeing Co., former colleagues have defended a former pilot who voiced concerns about unreported 737 MAX software problems two years before fatal crashes. Chief Technical Pilot Mark Forkner described in the leaked messages how MCAS cockpit software, which has since been linked to crashes in Indonesia in 2018 and in Ethiopia in March this year, was "running rampant" during a flight simulator session. The messages fuelled speculation that either Boeing or Forkner or both knew about problems with the plane's flight control software well before the two crashes which killed a total of 346 people, sending its shares sharply lower.

  • German WW2 U-boat base in France reboots as data center
    on 22/10/2019 at 4:56 pm

    The thick concrete walls of a long-abandonned World War Two German submarine base in Marseille, southern France, are set to find a new purpose: keeping banks of computer servers safe and cool. Dutch cloud services firm Interxion plans to invest 140 million euros to turn the "Martha Base" bunker - which was built in 1943 to accommodate up to 20 U-boats but was never completed - into a data center for corporate clients. During the German occupation of France, the bunker was meant to be the main German U-boat base in the Mediterranean, but Allied forces bombed the city in May 1944 and took it back in August that year.

  • Lyft's stock surges as co-founders see profitability earlier than expected
    on 22/10/2019 at 4:44 pm

    Lyft expects to be profitable earlier than expected. Yahoo Finance's On The Move discuss.

  • Here's What ePlus inc.'s (NASDAQ:PLUS) P/E Ratio Is Telling Us
    on 22/10/2019 at 3:59 pm

    This article is written for those who want to get better at using price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). To keep it...

  • Canada Votes for Climate Action. And Oil.
    on 22/10/2019 at 3:58 pm

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Canada’s masses have spoken. Good luck to the energy industry interpreting what they said.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Liberal Party have secured a second term in power, albeit having lost their majority. That latter point is critical for Canada’s oil and gas producers and shippers, as is the wider redistribution of seats.If there’s one defining aspect to take away from Canada’s election, it’s the deepening of divisions. Energy likes to flow, but Canada has become a case study in bottlenecks. Alongside the tortured saga of the Keystone XL pipeline to take Albertan oil south, other pipelines have been delayed or, in the case of Kinder Morgan Canada Ltd.’s Trans Mountain expansion to British Columbia, bought out by Ottawa to get it done. Five years ago, oil sands output was forecast to rise above four million barrels a day by the mid-2020s. That’s been pushed back to the early 2030s(1), and even that looks optimistic. Discounts on Canadian oil, reflecting the higher costs of transporting it by rail rather than pipeline, now routinely exceed $10 a barrel.Canada happens to be a large oil producer that also has a strong movement to deal with climate change. An opinion poll released in early September found 69% of Canadians thought climate change should be a top priority for the next government — but that 58% thought oil and gas development should also be a top priority. Little wonder, then, that after a campaign defined largely by arguments over carbon taxes and pipelines, Canada has ended up without a clear winner.Even so, the result is a net negative for fans of the oil sands. Trudeau’s green credentials are tempered by, among other things,  his backing for Trans Mountain. One of the more memorable press releases during the campaign was a mic-drop rebuttal of the Liberals’ climate plan by the New Democratic Party that read: “You. Bought. A. Pipeline.” Yet Trudeau may now rely on the likes of the NDP for crucial votes, providing leverage for a more assertive environmental agenda. Even if Trans Mountain survives, the likelihood of another major pipeline getting done just dimmed appreciably.Equally, while the Conservatives are spinning Monday’s election as a victory, having pushed Trudeau into a minority government and seemingly winning more votes, it looks largely hollow from the perspective of a place like Calgary. Yes, the Liberals were wiped out in the prairies. But then what else was expected, given the Conservatives’ pro-fossil fuel and low-tax manifesto? The fact remains they secured only about a third of the seats in an election where the incumbent was dogged by scandal and climate change was front and center. The Liberals, NDP and the Greens secured more than half the seats and the popular vote, while the Bloc Québécois — which also favors more stringent measures on carbon emissions — took another 11% of parliament. A future win for Conservatives will require securing support beyond its base, which demands a more nuanced approach on energy and climate issues.As we know, though, nuance is a rare commodity in politics right now, and Canada is no exception. The election exposed divisions between east and west and young and old, the latter a growing theme in the climate debate and democracies in general. The resurgence of the Bloc Québécois, along with the Liberals’ wipe out west of Ontario, raise the old demons of separatism, now with a climate-change dimension. Meanwhile, Trudeau finds himself battling several provincial governments over the imposition of a carbon tax. Conservatives clearly require a rethink, but it would be a mistake for climate-change activists to take Monday’s result as case closed. While Canada’s climate politics are quite different from those in the U.S., the clash between owners and employees of  incumbent energy interests and those pressing for a Green New Deal (or a new, green deal anyway) straddles the border.All this means Canada’s energy producers remain in a bind. Like at least some of their peers elsewhere in North America and, especially, in Europe, they know the pressure to deal with climate change is growing even as their profits depend on satisfying current demand for fossil fuels. The uncertainty exemplified by the election result will serve to deter at least some investment, raising the cost of capital for oil and gas producers (which is the ultimate strategy behind those pipeline protests). Ownership of Canada’s oil sands, which have seen an exodus of foreign companies such as Royal Dutch Shell Plc, will likely consolidate further. And with growth prospects dimming, producers should move toward even bigger payouts to support valuation, in keeping with the broader trend in a less-loved energy sector.What energy producers will want to avoid above all else is the risk of more interventionist or prescriptive laws — a growing theme in climate politics as the window for taking action has narrowed. That argues against simply doubling down on the Conservatives’ current platform or disappearing down the rabbit hole of separatism. Indeed, the new balance of power in parliament raises an intriguing prospect. Given the bargains Trudeau must now strike to keep power, Canada’s energy producers might be better off if Conservatives entertained working with him on some issues rather than just sticking to their guns.(1) Forecasts as per the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.To contact the author of this story: Liam Denning at [email protected] contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Gongloff at [email protected] column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Liam Denning is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering energy, mining and commodities. He previously was editor of the Wall Street Journal's Heard on the Street column and wrote for the Financial Times' Lex column. He was also an investment banker.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Here's Why We Think Universal Display (NASDAQ:OLED) Is Well Worth Watching
    on 22/10/2019 at 3:44 pm

    Like a puppy chasing its tail, some new investors often chase 'the next big thing', even if that means buying 'story...

  • Prudential, M&G Split: What Happens To Investor Stock In A Spinoff?
    on 22/10/2019 at 3:44 pm

    The long-awaited split between Prudential Public Limited Company (NYSE: PUK) and its subsidiary M&G gives investors the option to target their investment in their preferred portion of the insurance and asset management business. Prudential will focus more on Asian markets, while the newly demerged M&G takes on a broader approach, focusing on expanding globally. In an effort to simplify operations and grow more effectively, Prudential split its business segments into two companies.

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