Cancer Screening – BRCA Check – Breast and Ovarian

BRCA Check looks for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations

BRCA Check looks for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations
BRCA Check looks for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations

BRCA Check looks for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations to help women understand their hereditary risks for breast and ovarian cancers. Knowing that you have a mutation that increases your risk of developing cancer allows you to create a personalized plan designed to prevent or detect cancer at an earlier or more treatable stage. Complimentary genetic counseling is included.

What does it test for?

BRCA1 and BRCA 2 genetic mutations to help women understand their hereditary risks for breast and ovarian cancers. BRCA 1 mutation can increase chances of breast cancer up to 81% and ovarian cancer up to 54% by age 80.

Who should get tested?

The test is best suited for individuals with either a history of early onset breast or ovarian cancer or a strong family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Individuals with the following medical or family history factors should consider testing for mutations in BRCA1/2:

  • Early onset breast cancer (under 50 years of age)
  • Bilateral or multiple breast cancers
  • Diagnosed with both breast and ovarian cancer
  • Family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer
  • Two or more BRCA1 or BRCA2-related cancers in a single family member
  • Male breast cancer within family
  • Ashkenazi Jewish ethnic background

Test kit contents

  • Test box (88x120mm)
  • Anonymised patient ID
  • Saliva collection device
  • User guide
  • Bio hazard bag
  • Pre-paid return envelope

Why is getting tested for the BRCA gene mutation important?

The #1 cancer in women

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and the biggest cause of cancer related deaths.

1 in 8 people can be effected

It is estimated that 1 in 8 people will be effected by breast cancer in their lifetime.

Early detection is crucial

Early detection can result in a 90% survival rate, relative to a 5% survival rate for late diagnoses.

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